Book Club Kits

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multiple sets of books on shelves next to a sign that reads book club kits

 

Are you looking for your book club's next great read?

The library now has a collection of book club kits to make your search easier! All kits have at least 10 copies, and many include large print and audio formats. You can check out as many copies as you need for your group (subject to availability). Most titles are also available in ebook or audiobook formats from OverDrive and/or Hoopla. Please call the Information Desk at 825-0702 for more information or if you would like to borrow a kit.

Printable list of kits

KitDescription
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All This Could Be Different

Fiction
2022, 320p.

All This Could Be Different by Sarah Thankam Mathews

Sneha has moved to Milwaukee for an entry-level corporate job that is the key that unlocks every door: she can pick up the tab at dinner with her new friend Tig, get her college buddy Thom hired alongside her, and send money to her parents back in India. She begins dating women--soon developing a burning crush on Marina, a beautiful dancer who always seems just out of reach. But before long, painful secrets rear their heads; jobs go off the rails; evictions loom. Sneha struggles to be truly close and open with anybody, even as her friendships deepen, even as she throws herself headlong into a dizzying romance with Marina. It's then that Tig begins to draw up a radical solution to their problems, hoping to save them all.
> Discussion questions from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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American Marriage

Fiction
2018, 308p.

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by unimaginable circumstances. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime he didn't commit. As Roy's time in prison passes, Celestial is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy's conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.
> Discussion questions from Oprah.com
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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American Spy

Fiction
2018, 292p.

American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson

1986, Cold War. Marie Mitchell is a brilliant intelligence officer with the FBI, but she’s also a young black woman working in an old boys’ club. When she’s given the opportunity to join a shadowy task force aimed at undermining Thomas Sankara, the revolutionary president of Burkina Faso, she says yes.  Inspired by true events—Thomas Sankara is known as “Africa’s Che Guevara”—American Spy knits together a gripping spy thriller, a heartbreaking family drama, and a passionate romance.
> Discussion questions from Book Companion
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Poetry
1978, 54p.

And Still I Rise by Maya Angelou

A collection of poems from Maya Angelou which are powerful, distinctive and as always, full of lifting rhythms of love and remembering.

This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Barracoon

Nonfiction
2018, 193p.

Barracoon by Zora Neale Hurston

In 1927, Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.
> Teaching guide from author's website
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2017, 432p.

Beartown by Fredrik Backman

A poignant, charming novel about a forgotten town fractured by scandal, and the amateur hockey team that might just change everything.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2018, 426p.

Becoming by Michelle Obama

. In a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama shares her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher

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Fiction
2017, 342p.

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate

Learning that her grandmother was a victim of the corrupt Tennessee Children's Home Society, attorney and aspiriing politician Avery Stafford delves into her family's past and begins to wonder if some things are best kept secret.
> Digital Book Club Kit from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2015, 152p.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race"; a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black men and women-- bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up and murdered out of all proportions. In this profound letter to his adolescent son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher
This kit generously funded through a grant from Beyond the Page, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Madison Community Foundation.

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Black Buck

Fiction
2021, 388p.

Black Buck by Mateo Askaripour 

An unambitious twenty-two-year-old, Darren lives in a Bed-Stuy brownstone with his mother. Darren is content working at Starbucks in the lobby of a Midtown office building, hanging out with his girlfriend, Soraya, and eating his mother’s home-cooked meals. All that changes when a chance encounter with Rhett Daniels, the CEO of Sumwun, NYC’s hottest tech startup, results in an exclusive invitation for Darren to join an elite sales team. 
> Discussion questions
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Black Cake

Fiction
2022, 385p.

Black Cake by Charmaine Wilkerson

In present-day California, Eleanor Bennett's death leaves behind a puzzling inheritance for her two children, Byron and Benny: a traditional Caribbean black cake, made from a family recipe with a long history, and a voice recording. In her message, Eleanor shares a tumultuous story about a headstrong young swimmer who escapes her island home under suspicion of murder. The heartbreaking journey Eleanor unfolds, the secrets she still holds back, and the mystery of a long-lost child, challenge everything the siblings thought they knew about their family, and themselves. 
> Discussion questions from Reading Group Guides
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Black Ghost of Empire

Nonfiction
2022, 240p.

Black Ghost of Empire by Kris Manjapra

To fully understand why the shadow of slavery haunts us today, we must confront the flawed way that it ended. We celebrate abolition - in Haiti after the revolution, in the British Empire in 1833, in the United States during the Civil War. Yet in Black Ghost of Empire, acclaimed historian Kris Manjapra argues that during each of these supposed emancipations, Black people were dispossessed by the moves that were meant to free them. Emancipation, in other words, simply codified the existing racial caste system - rather than obliterating it. 
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Nonfiction
2020, 476p.

Caste by Isabel Wilkerson

Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system.  Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people’s lives and behavior and the nation’s fate. Using riveting stories about people she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day.
> Reader's Guide from publisher
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction (YA)
2018, 314p.

Darius the Great is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

Darius Kellner is about to take his first-ever trip to Iran, and it's pretty overwhelming—especially when he's also dealing with clinical depression, a disapproving dad, and a chronically anemic social life. Darius has never had a true friend before, but he meets Sohrab in Iran and soon Darius has never felt more like himself.  But when it’s time to go home to America, he’ll have to find a way to be himself on his own.
> Discussion Guide from the publisher

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Fiction (YA)
2017, 210p.

Dear Martin by Nic Stone

Justyce McAllister is top of his class and set for the Ivy League—but none of that matters to the police officer who just put him in handcuffs. And despite leaving his rough neighborhood behind, he can't escape the scorn of his former peers or the ridicule of his new classmates. Justyce looks to the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for answers. Then comes the day Justyce goes driving with his best friend, Manny, windows rolled down, music turned up, sparking the fury of a white off-duty cop beside them. Words fly. Shots are fired. Justyce and Manny are caught in the crosshairs. 
> Discussion questions
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Memoir
2018, 334p.

Educated by Tara Westover

Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she'd traveled too far, if there was still a way home.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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The End of the Beginning

Poetry
2021, 47p.

The End of the Beginning by Carrie Schonhoff

Schonhoff captures the spirit of her native Wisconsin while encapsulating the growth of her life’s journey and exciting next chapter.  This work will resonate deeply with readers from the Midwest and pull at the heartstrings of those that continue to face challenges but never stop dreaming. Her second book of poems addresses the importance of healing, moving on, and being ready to face a new beginning. Schonhoff’s newest work is a continuation of beliefs that we can heal by connecting and understanding one another on a deeper level through poetry.
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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The Family Chao Chang

Fiction
2022, 301p.

The Family Chao by Lan Samantha Chang

The residents of Haven, Wisconsin, have dined on the Fine Chao Restaurant’s delicious Americanized Chinese food for thirty-five years, happy to ignore any unsavory whispers about the family owners. But when brash, charismatic, and tyrannical patriarch Leo Chao is found dead―presumed murdered―his sons discover that they’ve drawn the exacting gaze of the entire town. The ensuing trial brings to light potential motives for all three brothers: Dagou, the restaurant’s reckless head chef; Ming, financially successful but personally tortured; and the youngest, gentle but lost college student James.
> Discussion questions
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Firekeeper's Daughter

YA Fiction
2021, 494p.

Firekeeper's Daughter by Angeline Boulley

As a biracial, unenrolled tribal member and the product of a scandal, Daunis Fontaine has never quite fit in—both in her hometown and on the nearby Ojibwe reservation. When her family is struck by tragedy, Daunis puts her dreams on hold to care for her fragile mother. After Daunis witnesses a shocking murder that thrusts her into a criminal investigation, she agrees to go undercover. But the deceptions keep piling up and soon the threat strikes too close to home.  
> Discussion questions from Bookish
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Nonfiction
1963, 106p.

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin's early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, this intensely personal and provocative document in the form of two letters written on the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation gave passionate voice to the emerging civil rights movement- and still lights the way to understanding race in America today.
> Teacher's Guide with discussion questions from the publisher
This kit generously funded through a grant from Beyond the Page, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Madison Community Foundation.

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Fiction
2016, 370p.

 

Forbidden by Beverly Jenkins

Rhine Fontaine is building the successful life he's always dreamed of--one that depends upon him passing for White. But for the first time in years, he wishes he could step out from behind the facade. The reason: Eddy Carmichael, the young woman he rescued in the desert. Outspoken, defiant, and beautiful, Eddy tempts Rhine in ways that could cost him everything...and the price seems worth paying.
> Discussion questions
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Four Winds

Fiction
2021, 454p.

Four Winds by Kristin Hannah

Texas, 1934. Millions are out of work and a drought has broken the Great Plains.  The Dust Bowl era has arrived with a vengeance.  In this uncertain and dangerous time, Elsa Martinelli must make an agonizing choice: fight for the land she loves or go west, to California, in search of a better life. 
> Discussion questions from author's website
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2020, 368p.

The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Daré

The unforgettable, inspiring story of a teenage girl growing up in a rural Nigerian village who longs to get an education so that she can find her “louding voice” and speak up for herselfDespite the seemingly insurmountable obstacles in her path, Adunni never loses sight of her goal of escaping the life of poverty she was born into so that she can build the future she chooses for herself - and help other girls like her do the same. 
> Reading Guide with discussion questions from the Litlovers.com
This kit generously funded through Read Africa, a grant from the African Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Fiction (YA)
2017, 444p.

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

16-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Starr is the only person who knows what actually happened that night, but what she does or does not say could upend her community... and even endanger her life.
> Reader's Group Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2020, 342 p.

The Henna Artist by Alka Joshi

Escaping from an abusive marriage, seventeen-year-old Lakshmi makes her way alone to the vibrant 1950s pink city of Jaipur. There she becomes the most highly requested henna artist—and confidante—to the wealthy women of the upper class. But while trusted with the secrets of the wealthy, she can never reveal her own.
> Book Club guide from Harlequin for Libraries
This kit generously funded through the South Asia in Wisconsin Books Project grant from the Center for South Asia at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Nonfiction
2016, 346 p.

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

Set amid the civil rights movement, the true story of NASA’s African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in America’s space program. Before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as ‘Human Computers’, calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. Segregated from their white counterparts, these women used pencil and paper to write the equations that would launch rockets and astronauts, into space.
> Reading Group Guide from publisher
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2016, 305p.

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonial, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle's women's dungeon, and then shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery. Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Yaa Gyasi's has written a modern masterpiece, a novel that moves through histories and geographies and captures the troubled spirit of our own nation.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2020, 345p.

Homeland Elegies by Ayad Akhtar

A deeply personal work about hope and identity in a nation coming apart at the seams, Homeland Elegies blends fact and fiction to tell an epic story of belonging and dispossession in the world that 9/11 made. Part family drama, part social essay, part picaresque adventure -- at its heart, it is the story of a father, a son, and the country they both call home.
> Discussion questions from publisher
This kit generously funded through the South Asia in Wisconsin Books Project grant from the Center for South Asia at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Memoir
2019, 192p.

How We Fight For Our Lives by Saeed Jones

A stunning coming-of-age memoir about a young, black, gay man from the South as he fights to carve out a place for himself, within his family, within his country, within his own hopes, desires, and fears; a portrait of what we all do for one another- and to one another- as we fight to become ourselves.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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How the Word is Passed

Nonfiction
2021, 336p.

How the Word is Passed by Clint Smith

Poet and contributor to The Atlantic Clint Smith’s revealing, contemporary portrait of America as a slave owning nation. Beginning in his own hometown of New Orleans, Clint Smith leads the reader through an unforgettable tour of monuments and landmarks-those that are honest about the past and those that are not-that offer an intergenerational story of how slavery has been central in shaping our nation's collective history, and ourselves.
> Teaching Guide from UW-Madison
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2018, 346p.

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

It's 1969 in New York, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die so the Gold children sneak out to hear their fortunes. Golden-boy Simon escapes to the West Coast, searching for love in '80s San Francisco; dreamy Klara becomes a Las Vegas magician, obsessed with blurring reality and fantasy; eldest son Daniel seeks security as an army doctor post-9/11; and bookish Varya throws herself into longevity research, where she tests the boundary between science and immortality.
> Discussion questions from LitLovers.com
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2012, 308p.

January First by Michael Schofield

Diagnosed at age six with one of the most severe cases of child-onset schizophrenia on record, January Schofield hallucinated constantly and the line dividing delirium from reality grew dangerously blurry. This is her father's soul-bearing memoir of the daily challenges and unwavering commitment to save his daughter from the edge of insanity while doing everything he can to keep his family together.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher

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Kindred

Fiction
2003, 287p.

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The first science fiction written by a Black woman, Kindred has become a cornerstone of Black American literature. This combination of slave memoir, fantasy, and historical fiction is a novel of rich literary complexity. Having just celebrated her 26th birthday in 1976 California, Dana, is suddenly and inexplicably wrenched through time into antebellum Maryland. After saving a drowning white boy there, she finds herself staring into the barrel of a shotgun and is transported back to the present just in time to save her life. During numerous such time-defying episodes with the same young man, she realizes the challenge she’s been given.
> Discussion questions
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Last Black Unicorn

Nonfiction
2017, 278p.

The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish

Placed in the foster care system as a teen, and struggling to read at a basic level in ninth grade, Haddish found that humor and jokes helped her endure. When offered a choice between the Laugh Factory comedy camp or counseling to help recover from issues within the foster system, she chose the former and found her calling. In her first book, Haddish recounts her early life straight through to her powerhouse success both on the comedy circuit and in Hollywood with the 2017 film Girls Trip.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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The Last Thing He Told Me

Fiction
2021, 306p.

The Last Thing He Told Me by Laura Dave

Before Owen Michaels disappears, he manages to smuggle a note to his beloved wife of one year: Protect her. Despite her confusion and fear, Hannah Hall knows exactly to whom the note refers: Owen’s sixteen-year-old daughter, Bailey. Bailey, who lost her mother tragically as a child. Bailey, who wants absolutely nothing to do with her new stepmother.  As Hannah’s increasingly desperate calls to Owen go unanswered; as the FBI arrests Owen’s boss; as a US Marshal and FBI agents arrive at her Sausalito home unannounced, Hannah quickly realizes her husband isn’t who he said he was. And that Bailey just may hold the key to figuring out Owen’s true identity—and why he really disappeared.
> Discussion questions from Reading Group Guides
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2017, 263p.

Less by Andrew Sean Greer

Arthur Less is a failed novelist.  A wedding invitation arrives in the mail: his ex- boyfriend is getting married. Arthur can’t accept the invitation--it would all be too awkward--and he can’t say no--it would look like defeat.  On desk are a series of half-baked literary invitations he has received from around the world.  Arthur decides to accept all of them in order to skip town. Thus begins a trip that will take Arthur to Mexico, Italy, Germany, Morocco, India and Japan.
> Discussion questions from PBS
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2008, 285 p.

Life Beyond Measure by Sidney Poitier

Sidney Poitier reflects on his amazing life in Life Beyond Measure, offering inspirational advice and personal stories in the form of extended letters to his great-granddaughter. Writing for all who admire his example and who search for wisdom only a man of great experience can offer, this American icon shares his thoughts on love, faith, courage, and the future.
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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The Lincoln Highway Towles


Fiction
2021, 576p.

The Lincoln Highway by Amor Towles

In June, 1954, eighteen-year-old Emmett Watson is driven home to Nebraska by the warden of the work farm where he has just served a year for involuntary manslaughter. When the warden drives away, Emmett discovers that two friends from the work farm have hidden themselves in the trunk of the warden’s car. Together, they have hatched an altogether different plan for Emmett’s future.
> Discussion questions from the author's website
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2017, 338p.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Elena Richardson lives in a Cleveland suburb where everything is planned and people play by the rules. But her family's idyllic life is upended by the arrival of Mia Warren- enigmatic artist and single mother- who creates a stir when another family tries to adopt a Chinese-American baby. A novel that explores the weight of secrets, the nature of art and identity, the ferocious pull of motherhood, and the danger of believing that following the rules can avert disaster.
> Reading Group Guide from the author's website
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2017, 326p.

The Lost City of the Monkey God by Douglas Preston

Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God.  Three quarters of a century later, author Doug Preston joined a team of scientists on a groundbreaking new quest - to find the lost city. Venturing into this raw, treacherous, but breathtakingly beautiful wilderness to explore, Preston and the team battled torrential rains, quickmud, disease-carrying insects, jaguars, and deadly snakes. 
> Reading Group Guide from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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The Lost Man

Fiction
2018, 340p.

The Lost Man by Jane Harper

Two brothers meet at the border of their vast cattle properties under the unrelenting sun of outback Queensland. They are at the stockman’s grave, a landmark so old, no one can remember who is buried there. But today, the scant shadow it casts was the last hope for their middle brother, Cameron. The Bright family’s quiet existence is thrown into grief and anguish. Something had been troubling Cameron. Did he lose hope and walk to his death? Because if he didn’t, the isolation of the outback leaves few suspects.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2014, 276p.

Malice by Keigo Higashino

Acclaimed novelist Kunihiko Hidaka is found brutally murdered in his home on the night before he's planning to leave Japan and relocate to Vancouver. His body is found in his office, a locked room, within his locked house, by his wife and his best friend, both of whom have rock solid alibis. Malice is one of the bestselling novels in Keigo Higashino's series featuring police detective Kyoichiro Kaga.
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction/
Graphic Novel
2013, 121p.
2015, 187p.
2016, 246p.

March written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, illustrated by Nate Powell

The inside story of the Civil Rights Movement, as told through the eyes of one of its most iconic figures, Congressman John Lewis. This award-winning graphic novel trilogy brings the lessons of history to vivid life, urgently relevant for today's world.
> March is a 3-book series. Book groups may borrow any one or all three of the books, subject to availability.
> Teacher Guides from publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.
 

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The Midnight Library Haig


Fiction
2020, 304p.

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. Would any of these other lives be better?  Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2014, 309p.

Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart by Carol Wall

Carol Wall is at a crossroads in her life: children grown; beloved parents getting older. One day she meets a man tending her neighbor's yard. His name is Giles Owita. He comes from Kenya and he's very good at gardening. Soon Giles is transforming not only Carol's yard, but her heart. Despite their differences, a caring bond grows between them.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers

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Motherhood So White


Nonfiction
2019, 304p.

Motherhood So White by Nefertiti Austin

In America, Mother = White.  That's what Nefertiti, a single African American woman, discovered when she decided she wanted to adopt a Black baby boy out of the foster care system. Eager to finally join the motherhood ranks, Nefertiti was shocked when people started asking her why she wanted to adopt a "crack baby" or said that she would never be able to raise a Black son on her own. She realized that American society saw motherhood through a white lens, and that there would be no easy understanding or acceptance of the kind of family she hoped to build.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2016, 278p.

The Mothers by Brit Bennett

Set within a contemporary Black community in California, this debut novel follows 17-year-old Nadia Turner, grieving her mother's suicide. She takes up with the local pastor's son, resulting in a pregnancy and subsequent cover-up that will have an impact far beyond their youth. A surprising story about young love, a big secret in a small community, and the things that ultimately haunt us the most.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded through a grant from Beyond the Page, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Madison Community Foundation.

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Fiction
2019, 466p.

Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner

A  timely exploration of two sisters' lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places in a rapidly evolving world. Do we change, or does the world change us?
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2020, 377p.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

With dazzling candor, legal scholar Alexander challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signaled a new era of colorblindness, arguing that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it" -- and examines how the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control.
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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On Juneteenth

Nonfiction
2021, 148p.

On Juneteenth by Annette Gordon-Reed

Weaving together American history, dramatic family chronicle, and searing episodes of memoir, Annette Gordon-Reed’s On Juneteenth provides a historian’s view of the country’s long road to Juneteenth, recounting both its origins in Texas and the enormous hardships that African-Americans have endured in the century since, from Reconstruction through Jim Crow and beyond.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2017, 496p.

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant — and that her lover is married — she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son's powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations.
> Reading Group Guide from publisher
This kit generously funded through a grant from The Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Nonfiction
2019, 385p.

Parkland: Birth of a Movement by Dave Cullen

Intimate, deeply moving account of the extraordinary teenage survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, who became activists and pushed back against the NRA and Congressional leaders, inspiring millions of Americans to join their grassroots #neveragain movement. An in-depth examination of a pivotal moment in American culture, Parkland explores hope after tragedy and is an inspiring call to action.
> Discussion Questions from UW-Madison Go Big Read
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2008, 372p.

People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks

In 1996, Hanna Heath, an Australian rare-book expert, is offered the job of a lifetime: analysis and conservation of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah. Priceless and beautiful, the book is one of the earliest Jewish volumes ever to be illuminated with images. When Hanna discovers a series of tiny artifacts in its ancient binding she begins to unlock the book’s mysteries. The reader is ushered into an exquisitely detailed and atmospheric past, tracing the book’s journey from its salvation back to its creation.
> Reader's guide from the publisher's website
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2018, 330p.

The Poison Squad by Deborah Blum

From Pulitzer Prize winner Deborah Blum, the dramatic true story of how food was made safe in the United States.By the end of nineteenth century, food was dangerous. Then, in 1883, Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley was named chief chemist of the agriculture department, and the agency began methodically investigating food and drink fraud, conducting shocking human tests on groups of young men who came to be known as, "The Poison Squad."
> Discussion Questions from UW-Madison Go Big Read.

 

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Project Hail Mary

Science Fiction
2021, 476p.

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Ryland Grace is the sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission—and if he fails, humanity and the earth itself will perish.  Except that right now, he doesn’t know that. He can’t even remember his own name, let alone the nature of his assignment or how to complete it.  All he knows is that he’s been asleep for a very long time. And he’s just been awakened to find himself millions of miles from home, with nothing but two corpses for company. Ryland realizes that an impossible task now confronts him. Hurtling through space on this tiny ship, it’s up to him to puzzle out an impossible scientific mystery—and conquer an extinction-level threat to our species.
> Discussion questions from BookClubChat
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2020, 751p.

A Promised Land by Barack Obama

In the first volume of his presidential memoirs, Barack Obama tells the story of his improbable odyssey from young man searching for his identity to leader of the free world, describing in strikingly personal detail both his political education and the landmark moments of the first term of his historic presidency—a time of dramatic transformation and turmoil.  Obama takes readers on a compelling journey from his earliest political aspirations to the pivotal Iowa caucus victory that demonstrated the power of grassroots activism to the watershed night of November 4, 2008, when he was elected 44th president of the United States, becoming the first African American to hold the nation’s highest office.
> Discussion Questions and more from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Real Friends Talk About Race


Nonfiction
2023, 272p.

Real Friends Talk About Race by Yseult P. Mukantabana

Real Friends Talk About Race is an essential guide for those who want to have stronger interracial relationships —whether it’s with friends, colleagues, or loved ones.  Having conversations about race is uncomfortable. But for progress between individuals (and our communities) to happen, we need to be able to speak openly and honestly. Podcast hosts of The Kinswomen Yseult and Hannah use their own friendship and experiences from different racial backgrounds to offer guidance on navigating these layered conversations.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Remarkably Bright Creatures

Fiction
2022, 360p.

Remarkably Bright Creatures by Shelby Van Pelt

After Tova Sullivan's husband died, she began working the night shift at the Sowell Bay Aquarium, mopping floors and tidying up. Keeping busy has always helped her cope, which she's been doing since her eighteen-year-old son, Erik, mysteriously vanished on a boat in Puget Sound over thirty years ago. Tova becomes acquainted with Marcellus, a giant Pacific octopus living at the aquarium. Marcellus forms a remarkable friendship with Tova. Ever the detective, Marcellus deduces what happened the night Tova's son disappeared. And now Marcellus must use every trick his old invertebrate body can muster to unearth the truth for her before it's too late.
> Discussion Questions from Reading Group Guides
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Book cover image displaying pianst Mary Lou Williams

Poetry
2019, 80p.

Remember Me: Mary Lou Williams by Fabu

This poetry collection captures the essence of the pianist and strong Black woman, Mary Lou Williams, in a poignant, moving, and expressive way.  This book presents the struggles and triumphs of Mary Lou Williams, and readers can feel the connection between the pianist and poet leap off the page.  The "conversations" between the Poet Fabu and Mary Lou provide a strong historical context of the type of wisdom that generations of Black women have engaged in, in an effort to navigate their way through the social, political, and economic obstacles that have attempted to silence their voices and negate their presence in the world.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Sag Harbor

Fiction
2009, 273p.

Sag Harbor by Colson Whitehead

The year is 1985. Benji Cooper is one of the only black students at an elite prep school in Manhattan. After a tragic mishap on his first day of high school his social doom is sealed for the next four years. But every summer, Benji escapes to the Sag Harbor, where a small community of African American professionals has built a world of their own. Because their parents come out only on weekends, he and his friends are left to their own devices for three glorious months.
>Reading Guide from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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The Seed Keeper

Fiction
2021, 372p.

The Seed Keeper by Diane Wilson

Rosalie Iron Wing has grown up in the woods with her father, Ray, who tells her stories the origins of the Dakota people. One morning, Ray doesn't return from checking his traps. Told she has no family, Rosalie is sent to live with a foster family in nearby Mankato where she meets rebellious Gaby Makespeace, in a friendship that transcends the damaged legacies they've inherited.  Many years later, Rosalie returns to her childhood home. A widow and mother, she has spent the previous two decades on her white husband's farm, finding solace in her garden. Now, grieving, Rosalie begins to confront the past, on a search for family, identity, and a community where she can finally belong. 
> Discussion questions
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation

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Send For Me

Fiction
2021, 259p.

Send For Me by Lauren Fox

Annelise works at her parents' popular bakery in Feldenheim, Germany. There are rumors that anti-Jewish sentiment is on the rise, but Annelise and her parents can't quite believe that it will affect them; they're hardly religious at all. But as Annelise falls in love, marries, and gives birth to her daughter, the dangers grow closer. Annelise and her husband are given the chance to leave for America, but they must go without her parents. Two generations later, Annelise's granddaughter is a young woman newly in love. But when she stumbles upon a trove of her grandmother's letters from Germany, she sees the history of her family's sacrifices in a new light, and suddenly she's faced with an impossible choice: the past, or her future. 
> Discussion Questions and more from ReadingGroupGuides
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Seven Days in June

Fiction
2021, 328p.

Seven Days in June by Tia Williams

Brooklynite Eva Mercy is a single mom and bestselling erotica writer. Shane Hall is a reclusive, award-winning literary author who, to everyone's surprise, shows up in New York. When Shane and Eva meet unexpectedly at a literary event, sparks fly, raising the eyebrows of New York's Black literati. What no one knows is that twenty years earlier, teenage Eva and Shane spent one crazy, torrid week madly in love. They may be pretending that everything is fine now, but they can't deny their chemistry - or the fact that they've been secretly writing to each other in their books ever since. Over the next seven days in the middle of a steamy Brooklyn summer, Eva and Shane reconnect, but Eva's not sure how she can trust the man who broke her heart.
> Discussion questions from ReadingGroupGuides
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation

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Fiction
2018, 294p.

She Would Be King by Wayétu Moore

Moore’s debut novel reimagines the dramatic story of Liberia’s early years through three unforgettable characters. Gbessa, exiled from the West African village of Lai, is starved and left for dead, but still she survives. June Dey, raised on a plantation in Virginia, hides his unusual strength until a confrontation with the overseer forces him to flee. Norman Aragon, the child of a white British colonizer and a Maroon slave from Jamaica, can fade from sight when the earth calls him. When the three meet in the settlement of Monrovia, their gifts help them salvage the tense relationship between the African American settlers and the indigenous tribes, as a new nation forms around them.
   > Reading Guide with discussion questions from the Litlovers.com
This kit generously funded through Read Africa, a grant from the African Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Fiction
2017, 289p

Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

Jojo and his sister, Kayla, live with their grandparents, Mam and Pop, and the occasional presence of their drug-addicted mother, Leonie, on a farm on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Leonie is simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high; Mam is dying of cancer; and quiet, steady Pop tries to run the household and teach Jojo how to be a man. When the white father of Leonie’s children is released from prison, she packs her kids and a friend into her car and sets out across the state for Parchman farm, the Mississippi State Penitentiary, on a journey rife with danger and promise.
> Discussion questions from PBS
This kit generously funded through a grant from Beyond the Page, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Madison Community Foundation.

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South to America

Nonfiction
2022, 410p.

South to America by Imani Perry

We all think we know the South. Even those who have never lived there can rattle off a list of signifiers: the Civil War, Gone with the Wind, the Ku Klux Klan, plantations, football, Jim Crow, slavery. But the idiosyncrasies, dispositions, and habits of the region are stranger and more complex than much of the country tends to acknowledge. In South to America, Imani Perry shows that the meaning of American is inextricably linked with the South, and that our understanding of its history and culture is the key to understanding the nation as a whole.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Nonfiction
2018, 248p.

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.
> Reading Group Guide from publisher
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2018, 369p.

A Spark of Light by Jodi Picoult

From one of the most provocative storytellers of our time, a timely and harrowing novel about a hostage situation at a women's reproductive health services center and the people caught up in it. Among them, a doctor and nurse, a pro-life protester disguised as a patient, the gunman, and the police hostage negotiator who learns that his teenage daughter is among those in the center.
> Discussion Questions and more from the author's website
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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State of Terror

Fiction
2021, 494p.

State of Terror by Hillary Rodham Clinton, Louise Penny

State of Terror follows a novice Secretary of State who has joined the administration of her rival, a president inaugurated after four years of American leadership that shrank from the world stage. A series of terrorist attacks throws the global order into disarray, and the secretary is tasked with assembling a team to unravel the deadly conspiracy, a scheme carefully designed to take advantage of an American government dangerously out of touch and out of power in the places where it counts the most.
>Discussion Questions from Bookclubchat
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2019, 310p.

Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid

Alix Chamberlain is shocked when her babysitter, Emira Tucker, is accused by a store's security guard- seeing a young black woman out late with a white child- of kidnapping. A small crowd gathers, a bystander films everything, and Emira is furious and humiliated. Alix resolves to make things right, but Emira is aimless, broke, and wary of Alix's desire to help. Both women find themselves on a crash course that will upend everything they think they know about themselves, and each other.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2021, 415p.

The Sum of Us by Heather McGhee

From the financial crisis to rising student debt to collapsing public infrastructure, McGhee found a common root problem: racism. But not just in the most obvious indignities for people of color. Racism has costs for white people, too. It is the common denominator of our most vexing public problems, the core dysfunction of our democracy and constitutive of the spiritual and moral crises that grip us all. McGhee embarks on a deeply personal journey across the country from Maine to Mississippi to California, tallying what we lose when we buy into the zero-sum paradigm--the idea that progress for some of us must come at the expense of others.
> Discussion Guide
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2017, 371p.

The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

In a remote mountain village where life revolves around the seasons and the farming of tea, a stranger in a jeep marks the arrival of the modern world, and Li-yan begins to reject generations-old customs. She leaves a baby born out of wedlock at an orphanage, and leaves her insular village for an education and city life. Her daughter is raised by loving adoptive parents in California. Over the course of years, each searches for meaning in the study of Pu'er, the tea that has shaped their family's destiny for centuries. A powerful story about circumstances, culture, distance and the bond of family.
> Discussion Questions from author website
This kit generously funded through a grant from The Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Fiction
2019, 374p.

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix Harrow

In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, young January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As a ward of wealthy Mr. Locke in the early 1900s, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored, and utterly out of place. Then she finds a strange book, one that carries the scent of other worlds, and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page turn reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2011, 337p.

The Tiger's Wife by Téa Obreht

In a Balkan country mending from years of conflict, Natalia, a young doctor, arrives on a mission of mercy at an orphanage by the sea. By the time she and her lifelong friend Zóra begin to inoculate the children there, she feels age-old superstitions and secrets gathering everywhere around her. Secrets her outwardly cheerful hosts have chosen not to tell her. Secrets involving the strange family digging for something in the surrounding vineyards. Secrets hidden in the landscape itself.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2020, 261p.

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi

Gifty is a fifth-year candidate in neuroscience at Stanford School of Medicine studying reward-seeking behavior in mice and the neural circuits of depression and addiction. Her brother, Nana, was a gifted high school athlete who died of a heroin overdose after a knee injury left him hooked on OxyContin. Her suicidal mother is living in her bed. Gifty is determined to discover the scientific basis for the suffering she sees all around her.  But even as she turns to the hard sciences to unlock the mystery of her family's loss, she finds herself hungering for her childhood faith and grappling with the evangelical church in which she was raised, whose promise of salvation remains as tantalizing as it is elusive.
> Discussion questions from the publisher
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
1943, 498p.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Francie Nolan is growing up in the Williamsburg slums of Brooklyn. With an alcoholic father and an aunt with frequent marriages, no one- least of all Francie- could say that the Nolans' life lacks drama. By turns overwhelming, heartbreaking and uplifting, the Nolans' daily experiences are raw with honesty and tenderly threaded with family connectedness.
> Discussion Questions from ReadingGroupGuides
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2020, 244p.

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho

Acho takes on all the questions, large and small, insensitive and taboo, many white Americans are afraid to ask—yet which all Americans need the answers to, now more than ever. With the same open-hearted generosity that has made his video series a phenomenon, Acho explains the vital core of such fraught concepts as white privilege, cultural appropriation, and “reverse racism.”
> Discussion questions from ReadingGroupGuides
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Nonfiction
2019, 350p.

The Ungrateful Refugee by Dina Nayeri

At age eight, Dina Nayeri fled Iran along with her mother and brother and lived in the crumbling shell of an Italian hotel-turned-refugee-camp. Eventually she was granted asylum in America. She settled in Oklahoma, then made her way to Princeton University. In this book, Nayeri weaves together her own vivid story with the stories of other refugees and asylum seekers in recent years, bringing us inside their daily lives and taking us through the different stages of their journeys, from escape to asylum to resettlement.
> Discussion questions from Hoopla
This kit generously funded through a grant from Beyond the Page, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Madison Community Foundation.

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Violin Conspiracy

Fiction
2022, 345p.

The Violin Conspiracy by Brendan Slocumb

Ray McMillian loves playing the violin more than anything, and nothing will stop him from pursuing his dream of becoming a professional musician. Not his mother, who thinks he should get a real job, not the fact that he can't afford a high-caliber violin, not the racism inherent in the classical music world. And when he makes the startling discovery that his great-grandfather's fiddle is actually a priceless Stradivarius, his star begins to rise. Then with the international Tchaikovsky Competition—the Olympics of classical music—fast approaching, his prized family heirloom is stolen. Ray is determined to get it back. But now his family and the descendants of the man who once enslaved Ray's great-grandfather are each claiming that the violin belongs to them. 
> Discussion questions from author's website
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Fiction
2019, 403p.

The Water Dancer by Ta'Nehisi Coates

Hiram Walker was born into bondage. When his mother was sold away, Hiram was robbed of all memory of her but was gifted with a mysterious power. Years later, when Hiram almost drowns in a river, that same power saves his life. This brush with death births an urgency in Hiram and a daring scheme: to escape from the only home he’s ever known.  This journey takes Hiram from Virginia’s plantations to desperate guerrilla cells in the wilderness, from the coffin of the Deep South to dangerously movements in the North. Throughout it all, Hiram’s resolve to rescue the family he left behind endures.
> Discussion questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

 

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Fiction
2020, 366p.

We Ride Upon Sticks by Barry Quan

Set in the coastal town of Danvers, Massachusetts (which in 1692 was the site of the origins of the Salem Witch Trials), the story follows the Danvers High field hockey team as they discover that the dark impulses of their Salem forebears may be the key to a winning season. The 1989 Danvers Falcons are on an unaccountable winning streak.  Helmed by good-girl captain Abby Putnam and her co-captain Jen Fiorenza, whose bleached blond "Claw" sees and knows all, the DHS Falcons prove to be as wily and original as their North of Boston ancestors, flaunting society's stale notions of femininity in order to find their glorious true selves through the crucible of team sport.
> Discussion questions from AllArts.org

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What the Fireflies Knew

Fiction
2022, 288p.

What the Fireflies Knew by Kai Harris

After her father dies of an overdose and the debts incurred from his addiction cause the loss of the family home in Detroit, almost-eleven-year-old Kenyatta Bernice (KB) and her teenage sister, Nia, are sent by their overwhelmed mother to live with their estranged grandfather in Lansing.  Pinballing between resentment, abandonment, and loneliness, KB is forced to carve out a different identity for herself and find her own voice. As she examines the jagged pieces of her recently shattered world, she learns that while some truths cut deep, a new life--and a new KB--can be built from the shards.
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Fiction
2018, 370p.

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. She's barefoot and wild; unfit for polite society. In late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark. But Kya is not what they say. Abandoned at age ten, she has survived on her own in the marsh that she calls home. A born naturalist, she takes life lessons from the land. But while she could have lived in solitude forever, the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. Drawn to two young men from town, who are each intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new and startling world--until the unthinkable happens.
> Discussion questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2018, 169p.

White Fragility by Robin Diangelo

Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, anti-racist educator Robin DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what can be done to engage more constructively.
> Discussion questions from LitLovers
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2003, 453p.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? by Beverly Daniel Tatum, PhD

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about communicating across racial and ethnic divides and pursuing antiracism. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious.
> Discussion questions from author website
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.

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Yellowface

Fiction
2023, 329p.

Yellowface by R.F. Kuang

Authors June Hayward and Athena Liu were supposed to be twin rising stars: same year at Yale, same debut year in publishing. But Athena's a cross-genre literary darling, and June didn't even get a paperback release. So when June witnesses Athena's death in a freak accident, she acts on impulse: she steals Athena's just-finished masterpiece. So what if June edits Athena's novel and sends it to her agent as her own work? So what if she lets her new publisher rebrand her as Juniper Song--complete with an ambiguously ethnic author photo? But June can't get away from Athena's shadow, and emerging evidence threatens to bring June's (stolen) success down around her. As June races to protect her secret, she discovers exactly how far she will go to keep what she thinks she deserves.
> Discussion questions from Reading Group Guides
This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

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Nonfiction
2021, 215p.

You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey by Amber Ruffin and Lacey Lamar

Writer and talk show host Amber Ruffin lives in New York, where everyone is, as she puts it, "stark raving normal." But her sister, Lacey, still lives in their home state of Nebraska, where she encounters racist donut shops and strangers putting their hand in her hair, mistaking her for a prostitute and for Harriet Tubman. Lacey is the perfect mix of polite, beautiful, petite, and Black that apparently makes people think "I can say whatever I want to this woman." Amber and Lacey’s entertainingly horrifying stories- painfully relatable or shockingly eye-opening- tackle modern-day racism with the perfect balance of levity and gravity.
> Reading Group Guide from publisher
This kit generously funded by the Library Foundation.