Book Club Kits

 

Are you looking for your book club's next great read?

The library now has a collection of book club kits to make your search easier! All kits have at least 10 copies, and many include large print and audio formats. You can check out as many copies as you need for your group (subject to availability). Most titles are also available in ebook or audiobook formats from OverDrive and/or Hoopla. Please call the Information Desk at 825-0702 for more information or if you would like to borrow a kit.

Kit

Description


Fiction
2017, 432p.

Beartown, by Fredrik Backman

A poignant, charming novel about a forgotten town fractured by scandal, and the amateur hockey team that might just change everything. Beartown explores the hopes that bring a small community together, the secrets that tear it apart, and the courage it takes for an individual to go against the grain.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher.


Memoir
2018, 426p.

Becoming, by Michelle Obama

Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America, she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history. In a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, she shares her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher.


Fiction
2017, 342p.

Before We Were Yours, by Lisa Wingate

Two families, generations apart, are forever changed by a heartbreaking injustice in this poignant novel, inspired by a true story. Learning that her grandmother was a victim of the corrupt Tennessee Children's Home Society, attorney and aspiriing politician Avery Stafford delves into her family's past and begins to wonder if some things are best kept secret.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Digital Book Club Kit from the publisher. Includes photos, discussion questions, and recipes!


Nonfiction
2015, 152p.

Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race"; a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black men and women-- bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up and murdered out of all proportions. In this profound letter to his adolescent son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis.
> FInd this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher.
> Suggestion for book clubs: Consider pairing this title with James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time.


Memoir
2018, 334p.

Educated, by Tara Westover

Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she'd traveled too far, if there was still a way home.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher.


Nonfiction
1963, 106p.

The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin

At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin's early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, this intensely personal and provocative document in the form of two letters written on the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation gave passionate voice to the emerging civil rights movement- and still lights the way to understanding race in America today.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Teacher's Guide with discussion questions from the publisher.
> Suggestion for book clubs: Consider pairing this title with Ta-Nehisi Coates' Between the World and Me.
> This kit generously funded through a grant from Beyond the Page, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Madison Community Foundation.

Fiction
2017, 444p.

The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas

16-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Starr is the only person who knows what actually happened that night, but what she does or does not say could upend her community... and even endanger her life.
> Find this title on OverDrive or Find this title on Hoopla.
> Reader's Group Guide from the publisher.
> This kit purchased with funds from the Library Foundation.


Memoir
2019, 192p.

How We Fight For Our Lives, by Saeed Jones

A stunning coming-of-age memoir about a young, black, gay man from the South as he fights to carve out a place for himself, within his family, within his country, within his own hopes, desires, and fears; a portrait of what we all do for one another- and to one another- as we fight to become ourselves.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher.
> This kit generously funded by the Friends of the Library.


Nonfiction
2012, 308p.

January First, by Michael Schofield

Diagnosed at age six with one of the most severe cases of child-onset schizophrenia on record, January Schofield hallucinated constantly and the line dividing delerium from reality grew dangerously blurry. This is her father's soul-bearing memoir of the daily challenges and unwavering commitment to save his daughter from the edge of insanity while doing everything he can to keep his family together.
> Find the ebook on OverDrive  or  Find the audiobook on Hoopla.
> Discussion Questions from the publisher.


Fiction
2017, 338p.

Little Fires Everywhere, by Celeste Ng

Elena Richardson lives in a Cleveland suburb where everything is planned and people play by the rules. But her family's idyllic life is upended by the arrival of Mia Warren- enigmatic artist and single mother- who creates a stir when another family tries to adopt a Chinese-American baby. A novel that expolores the weight of secrets, the nature of art and identity, the ferocious pull of motherhood, and the danger of believing that following the rules can avert disaster.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Reading Group Guide from the author's website.


Nonfiction/
Graphic Novel

2013, 121p.
2015, 187p.
2016, 246p.

March, written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, illustrated by Nate Powell

The inside story of the Civil Rights Movement, as told through the eyes of one of its most iconic figures, Congressman John Lewis. This award-winning graphic novel trilogy brings the lessons of history to vivid life, urgently relevant for today's world.
> March is a 3-book series. Book groups may borrow any one or all three of the books, subject to availability.
> Find the books on OverDrive  or  Find the books on Hoopla.
 
 


Nonfiction
2014, 309p.

Mister Owita's Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart, by Carol Wall

Carol Wall, living in a lily-white neighborhood in Middle America, is at a crossroads in her life: children grown; beloved parents getting older. One day she notices a dark-skinned African man tending her neighbor's yard. His name is Giles Owita. He bags groceries at the supermarket. He comes from Kenya. And he's very good at gardening. Soon Giles is transforming not only Carol's yard, but her heart. Despite their differences, a caring bond grows between them. And both hold secrets that, when revealed, will cement their friendship forever.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers.


Fiction
2016, 278p.

The Mothers, by Brit Bennett

Set within a contemporary black community in California, this dazzling debut novel follows 17-year-old Nadia Turner, grieving her mother's suicide. She takes up with the local pastor's son, resulting in a pregnancy and subsequent cover-up that will have an impact far beyond their youth. A surprising story about young love, a big secret in a small community, and the things that ultimately haunt us the most.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers.


Fiction
2019, 466p.

Mrs. Everything, by Jennifer Weiner

A smart, thoughtful and timely exploration of two sisters' lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places- and be true to themselves- in a rapidly evolving world. Mrs. Everything is an ambitious, richly textured journey through history- and herstory- as these two sisters navigate a changing America over the course of their lives. Do we change, or does the world change us?
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Reading Group Guide from the publisher.


Nonfiction
2020, 377p.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander

Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Alexander challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signalled a new era of colorblindness, arguing that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it" -- and examines how the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control. This 10th anniversary edition includes a new preface by Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform today.
> Find this title on OverDrive  or  Find this title on Hoopla.
> Discussion Questions from The Advocates for Human Rights.


Nonfiction
2019, 385P.

Parkland: Birth of a Movement, by Dave Cullen

Intimate, deeply moving account of the extraordinary teenage survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, who became activists and pushed back against the NRA and Congressional leaders, inspiring millions of Americans to join their grassroots #neveragain movement. An in-depth examination of a pivotal moment in American culture, Parkland explores hope after tragedy and is an inspiring call to action.
> Find this title on OverDrive  or  Find this title on Hoopla.
> Discussion Questions from UW-Madison Go Big Read.


Fiction
2018, 369p.

A Spark of Light, by Jodi Picoult

From one of the most provocative storytellers of our time, a timely and harrowing novel about a hostage situation at a women's reproductive health services center and the people caught up in it. Among them, a doctor and nurse, a pro-life protester disguised as a patient, the gunman, and the police hostage negotiator who learns that his teenage daughter is among those in the center.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions and more from the author's website.


Fiction
2019, 310p.

Such a Fun Age, by Kiley Reid

Alix Chamberlain is shocked when her babysitter, Emira Tucker, is accused by a store's security guard- seeing a young black woman out late with a white child- of kidnapping. A small crowd gathers, a bystander films everything, and Emira is furious and humiliated. Alix resolves to make things right, but Emira is aimless, broke, and wary of Alix's desire to help. Both women find themselves on a crash course that will upend everything they think they know about themselves, and each other.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from LitLovers.

 
Fantasy
2019, 374p.

The Ten Thousand Doors of January, by Alix Harrow

In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, young January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As a ward of wealthy Mr. Locke in the early 1900s, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored, and utterly out of place. Then she finds a strange book, one that carries the scent of other worlds, and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page turn reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own.
> Find this title on OverDrive.
> Discussion Questions from Modern Mrs. Darcy.

 
Fiction
1943, 498p.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith

Beloved American classic about a young girl's coming-of-age at the turn of the twentieth century. Francie Nolan is growing up in the Williamsburg slums of Brooklyn. With an alcoholic father and an aunt with frequent marriages, no one- least of all Francie- could say that the Nolans' life lacks drama. By turns overwhelming, heartbreaking and uplifting, the Nolans' daily experiences are raw with honesty and tenderly threaded with family connectedness.
> Find this title on OverDrive  or  Find this title on Hoopla.
> Discussion Questions from ReadingGroupGuides.